Do You Have To Burp A 1 Month Old Baby Aeronautics and Air Pressure Science Proejcts for Homeschool Families

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Aeronautics and Air Pressure Science Proejcts for Homeschool Families

Take your science projects to the next level with this in-depth look at atmospheric pressure.

There is air surrounding us everywhere, all at the same pressure of 14.7 psi (pounds per square inch). It’s the same force you feel on your skin, whether you’re on the ceiling or the floor, under the bed or in the shower.

An interesting thing happens when you change an air pressure pocket – things start to move. This pressure difference that causes motion is what creates winds, tornadoes, planes to fly, and some of the experiments we are about to do right now.

One important thing to remember is that higher pressure always pushes things. (Meaning that lower pressure does not “pull”, but rather that we think of higher pressure as a “push”.)

Another interesting phenomenon occurs with fast moving air particles. When air is moving fast, it doesn’t have time to push on a nearby surface, like an airplane wing. It just zooms in, barely having time to touch the surface. The air particles are really squeezed.

Think of busy people driving fast in their cars. They are so busy doing other things and driving fast to get somewhere that they don’t have time to sit down and relax.

Atmospheric pressure works the same way. When air passes close to a surface (like an airplane wing) like fast cars, the fast air doesn’t have time to push on the surface and sit there, so less weight of air is put on the surface.

Less weight means less force on the area. (Think of “pressure” as a force on a given area or surface.)

This causes a region of lower (or lower) pressure wherever there is faster air movement.

Confused? Awesome! Let’s try some experiments to clarify these concepts so that they make sense to you.

Alright, let’s get started.

Air takes up space

In a large bowl (or sink or tub) filled with water, lower a clear cup, mouth side down, into the water. Let some of the air slowly escape into a second submerged cup (like “pouring the air up”). Remove one cup and realign the other mouth down, and using a flexible straw, blow into the down-facing cup mouth.

Magic water glass tower

Fill a glass two-thirds full with water. Cover the mouth with a plug and invert (holding the card in place) over a sink. Remove your hand from the card. There ! The card stays in place because air is heavier than water, and the card experiences about 15 pounds of upward pushing force from the air and only about one pound of downward pushing force from the water. .. from where the card stays in place.

(Try this with two glasses stacked mouth to mouth with the plug sandwiched in the middle. Remove the card…)

Plumber Magic

Take two clean old fashioned red rubber pistons and wooden sticks and glue them together (you may need to wet the rims first). Try to separate them. Why is it so difficult? When you pushed them together, air was pushed out of the cavity the interiors form when pushed together, leaving you with a pocket of lower air pressure inside, compared to the pressure of surrounding air of 14.7 pounds per square inch (psi) outside the pistons. Higher pressure always pushes and thus holds the pistons together.

Magic Egg Tower

Remove the shell from a hard-boiled egg and use a bottle with a neck large enough for the egg to be squeezed (without crushing it) – old-fashioned milk bottles work just fine. Light a match and stir it by quickly placing the egg (small end down) on the neck of the bottle. The air inside is consumed by the flame, reducing the air pressure inside the bottle. The higher pressure, now outside the bottle, pushes the egg out and in. (To remove the egg, turn the bottle upside down and make the egg small inside the bottle near the mouth. Blow hard into the mouth of the bottle.)

Barometer

Fill a cup two-thirds full of water. Cut the neck of a balloon and stretch it over the mouth of the cup, fitting it tightly (like a drum). Glue a straw to the top, making one end of the straw one-third from the edge of the drumhead, and the free end hanging down. Place next to a wall covered with paper and mark the final free position. Over the next month, you will be able to track the changes in pressure amplified by the straw.

burping bottle

Stick a lightweight plastic funnel firmly on top of a sturdy straw, inserting the other end of the straw into a hole drilled in the top of a water bottle. Use hot glue to seal the holes. Pour water into the funnel and watch it burp steadily.

Bottle Fountain

Seal a 2 liter bottle of sparkling water (half full of water) with a piece of clay wrapped around a long straw, sealing the straw at the mouth of the bottle. Blow hard into the straw. When you blow air into the bottle, the air pressure increases. This higher pressure pushes the water, which is forced up and out of the straw.

ping pong funnel

Insert a ping pong ball into a funnel and blow hard. (You can tilt your head back so the end of the ball is pointing at the ceiling. Can you blow hard enough that the ball stays inside when you reverse the funnel? Can you pick up a ball on the table?By blowing into the funnel, the air where the ball is in the funnel moves faster and generates lower air pressure than the rest of the air surrounding the ball.

This means that the pressure under the balloon is lower than that of the ambient air which is, by comparison, a higher pressure. This higher pressure pushes the ball back into the funnel…no matter how hard you blow or how you hold the funnel.

Crushed soda can

Heat an empty soda can (large beer cans will work best if you have one) in a skillet with a few tablespoons of water in the can on a hot stove. Have a shallow dish with about ¼ inch of ice water handy (enough water to make a seal with the top of the can). When the can emits steam, grab the can with tongs and quickly turn it over in the dish. CRACK! The air in the box has been heated and things that are hot tend to expand. When you cool it quickly by removing it from the stove onto a cold plate, the air cools and shrinks, creating a lower pressure inside. Since the surrounding air outside the box is now higher, it pushes up all sides of the box and crushes it.

Crushed balloon

Inflate a balloon so that it is just a little larger than the opening of a large jam jar and cannot be easily squeezed. Light a small piece of paper towel and place it in the jar. Place the ball on it. When the fire goes out, lift the balloon… and the jar goes with it! The air is consumed by the flame and lowers the air pressure inside the jar. The ambient air outside, now at a higher pressure than inside the jar, pushes the balloon into the jam jar.

The Million Dollar Bet

Take an empty water or soda bottle and lay it horizontally on a table. Carefully place a small ball of paper towel in the neck of the bottle. (The ball should be about half the size of the opening.) I’ll bet you a million dollars you can’t blow hard and get the paper into the bottle!

You try to force more air into the bottle, but there’s no room for the air already inside to leave, except to come out the mouth of the bottle, carrying the ball of paper with it.

Ping Pong Jump Cups

Place a ping pong ball in a cup only slightly larger than the ping pong ball. Blow on the ball and the ball jumps straight out of the cup! Do you remember the ideas about lower and upper pressure? By blowing on top of the balloon, you have created an area of ​​lower pressure than under the balloon. And higher pressure pushes the ball out of the cup!

Sneaky bottles

(Modify a water bottle in advance by punching a small hole near the bottom of the bottle with a thumbtack or pin.) Take two water bottles (one of which you just modified)​ ​and push a balloon into each bottle of water, stretching the end of the balloon over the neck of the bottle. Blow into each… what happened? There is no room for air in the unmodified bottle, so you cannot inflate the balloon. On the other hand, there is plenty of room for the balloon to expand in the modified bottle as there is a place for air to move in as the balloon grows…it pops out of the hole you drilled .

Flying papers

Hold a plain sheet of paper against your lower lip (you may need to fiddle a bit to find the exact location) and blow hard on the sheet. The leaf flies away! It’s the same reason airplanes can fly. When you blow on the top of the leaf, you decrease the air pressure (because the air moves faster), and therefore the pressure on the underside of the leaf is now higher, and more air pressure high pushes the sheet up.

kissing balloons

Inflate two balloons. Tie a piece of sting to each balloon. Have each hand hold a string so the balloons are at nose level, 6 inches apart. Blow hard between the balloons and watch them move!

Air pressure is lowered as you blow between balloons (think of air molecules like ping pong balls…these balls don’t have enough time to touch the surface of the balloon as they pass ).

The air that surrounds balloons that aren’t really moving is now at a higher pressure and pushes the balloons together.

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