How Much Tylenol Is Safe For 1 Month Old Baby Moving On Out – Top Ten Things To Take With You When You Move To Your New Teaching Job Abroad

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Moving On Out – Top Ten Things To Take With You When You Move To Your New Teaching Job Abroad

Once you’ve secured your new teaching position abroad, you’ll likely have several months to organize yourself before taking on the position. Here are the ten most important things to take with you when you move abroad. Read now, as some of these may take time to prepare properly!

1. Passport (valid for at least the duration of the contract)

You might think this is obvious considering we’re talking about moving your entire life to another country. Tell me, do you know when your passport expires? Mine expires in 2015.

Depending on where you live, obtaining a new passport can take up to 6 months. Relying on the form’s “estimated turnaround time” is unwise, as both the UK and the US have experienced extremely long delays in issuing new passports to their citizens in the past. Of course, if you’re pressed for time, you can usually request an express service at a ridiculously inflated cost.

So go now and check when your passport expires.

It is better to have a passport that is valid for the duration of your contract, because it is very painful to have to get a new one at a foreign consulate or embassy. Trust me; i had to do it!

2. Original documents proving who you are and what you know

Government offices do not usually accept copies of foreign identity cards or ID cards. Make sure you bring all the original documents with you. If you don’t have it, buy it.

It’s always a good idea to keep a copy at home, either with a family member, a lawyer, or in a safe, so get duplicates if you can. The extra stock is insurance against theft, fire or natural disaster and is reasonable.

You will need:

* Birth certificate

* Marriage certificate

* Police clearance

* Graduation certificates

* Teacher’s certificate

* Letters of recommendation

3. Medical records and adequate medication supplies

Anyone with an ongoing health problem in your family should ask for a copy of their medical records. You must obtain or obtain a copy of the vaccination record for your children.

Carry at least two months’ supply of your usual medicines. This will give you enough time to check the health services in your new country and register with a doctor.

Some medicines are sold under alternative brand names in different countries, so check with your doctor before you leave. It took me years to realize that Tylenol is the US brand name for paracetamol.

4. Vaccinations and vaccination certificate

You will be living and working abroad, which means you will meet all kinds of new organisms. Ask your doctor or a travel clinic to find out what vaccinations are recommended in the country you’re moving to, and be sure to let them know that you’ll be living there long-term, rather than just going on vacation for a week. two. If you are traveling to Thailand on holiday, the recommended vaccinations are different from those recommended if you are staying here for a period of time.

Get a vaccination certificate to prove what vaccinations you have received and ask your health care professional to note when you need a booster shot. Many vaccines are good for several years, but some require more than one shot before you are protected for any significant period of time.

5. Emergency numbers

This is another one that might seem obvious to you, but guess what, you don’t just need your mom’s phone number to check in when you arrive.

Bring at least these phone numbers with you:

* Responsible family member

* Your bank

* Your credit card company

* Your insurance company

* Your doctor

* Your travel agency

Now you can probably find most, if not all, of them online. But in an emergency, like when your wallet is stolen, do you really want the hassle?

6. International driver’s license

An international driver’s license is not a new driver’s license and you do not need to take a driving test. This is a document that you use abroad to make your national driver’s license acceptable to foreign officials. The international driver’s license is a small booklet that you hand over with your driver’s license when asked for.

It is essentially a translation of your driver’s license into many of the world’s prominent languages ​​so that officials in other countries can figure out what vehicles your license allows you to drive.

Even if you don’t intend to drive abroad, it’s a good document because you never know what the future will bring.

7. Contact details of the school, a copy of the teaching contract and a copy of all communications with the school (this can also be in digital format)

It would be a nightmare to arrive in a foreign country and find out that you don’t actually have the phone number or address of the school that is supposed to employ you, don’t you think? Your school will probably have some sort of orientation program to help you fit in, and that might even mean having someone meet you at the airport. But in case they don’t apply, have the school’s contact information handy.

Bring a copy of your teaching contract with you. It’s good to have a copy so you can check your terms and stand up for yourself if you feel you’re not getting what you promised.

When I moved to Thailand, I also made sure I had a copy of every email I received. I gradually deleted them as I settled in Bangkok and followed all the advice I received before moving.

8. Your children’s school records

Your children will probably go to the same school where you will work. Bring all their reports and transcripts with you to make sure they are placed in the right level. Knowing as much as possible about your child will help school administrators and counselors plan an appropriate orientation program for them.

9. Travel book, culture shock book

Don’t leave home without a travel guide! Take some time to look through different brands of travel guides. Different brands have different styles. I prefer a different brand for travel than long-term because of the depth of information available.

The Culture Shock series is great. Get the one for the country or region you’re moving to and read it cover to cover. You can gain insight into the cultural norms of the society you’re moving to and prevent yourself from making the kind of disastrous faux pas that could ruin your first months abroad. First impressions matter, make sure your first impression is a good one by doing some research.

10. Email addresses, mailing addresses and telephone numbers of friends and colleagues you have left behind

I also took away cards from friends and colleagues. You may be tempted to pack these in the shipment or even throw them away. However, if you have a great relationship with your colleagues, you will miss them. I found that when I was in the initial stages of culture shock, being around me reminded me of the good things I had left behind, but also all the things I didn’t like! It helped me refocus on the reasons why I moved my career abroad!

As a global nomad for over 10 years, I’ve come to realize that connecting with friends and colleagues back home is really up to me. In the first 6-7 years of teaching abroad, I didn’t keep in touch with the fabulous people I met and got to know, and that’s mostly my fault, because I didn’t make an effort.

I’ve been a lot more conscientious in recent years, and I think it’s worth it. I love catching up with old friends when I go back to places I used to live; I always have plenty of accommodation and have even hosted a few friends when they visited my new home.

Bonus tip for women!

Check if you can buy tampons where you are going! There are many countries in Asia and the Middle East where tampons cannot be found on supermarket or pharmacy shelves. Check, check and check again if you are a tampon user!

Anyone who sends me a package knows to use tampons as packing material rather than styrofoam chips!

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