How Often Do 1 Week Old Puppies Need To Eat Marche, or How Teams Work.

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Marche, or How Teams Work.

On the Northern Canadian Trail, “Marche” was a word that translated as “Mush” and was used to drive teams of dogs that were once the only source of power in the frozen north.

What was not translated was the original meaning of the word “Marche”, which was the French word for “walking”.

Don’t run, don’t rush or go faster, just walk.

In fact, the dog team only understands three commands: “Stop”, “Go” and “Take it easy”.

I was lucky enough to go dog sledding in Canada with “Snowy Owl Tours” under the careful guidance of Connie Arsenault.

He began the tour by introducing us to the dogs with an attention to detail born of genuine respect and care for his teams.

He explained how the team worked.

All dogs are attached to the sled by one common rope, to which each dog is attached with a separate harness, the direction of this line is the direction in which the sled travels and the effort of each animal can be measured from its orientation to the direction of travel from the sled.

Connie talked about the importance of choosing the right dogs for each team.

The position of the dogs in the team is determined by their size, courage and willingness to perform.

Connie explained,

“When we put our dogs on a team, we have front to back, lead dogs, point dogs, swing dogs and wheel dogs.

In a team of four pairs of eight dogs, the first pair is the lead dog.

They aren’t the strongest, but they have the intelligence, focus, temperament, and speed to keep up with other dogs.

If the lead dog doesn’t lead, the team won’t follow and the sled won’t go anywhere.

Next are point dogs, lead dogs, which are usually one year old.

Behind the team are the wheel dogs, these two are the power house of the team, strong and undramatic.

They take direction and then put their shoulders back, they get the job done.

In the middle is the schoolyard, swinging dogs.

This pair usually consists of a young dog and an older dog, perhaps an old lead or wheel dog that has started years ahead and has basically been replaced by a younger, more capable animal.

His usefulness isn’t over, strength isn’t the team’s only asset.

An old dog in the school yard or in a rocking position can now bring out a younger dog with the help of his role model and experience.

He, in turn, reacts and gets new energy from the younger dog’s enthusiasm.

These eight dogs will comfortably carry three people around all day, or they’ll fight and play just as happily in the snow.

These eight people make up the team.

Driving takes place exclusively through praise and recognition.

Praise for teamwork and individuality.

Connie explained the importance of our position to the team.

We were part of a team, but like dogs, we still had to earn the right to be there.

If we weren’t willing to jump off the bandwagon and give them a hand when they needed it, they would lose respect and stop pulling.

That included helping by pushing uphill and holding the sled back so it didn’t drive the dogs downhill.

It wasn’t our job to tell the team what to do, they already knew what it was better than we did.

Our job was to provide the physical and verbal support they needed to let them know their efforts were appreciated.

There are no passengers in the sled.

Connies reason for this explanation was because she cared about her teams and didn’t want us to upset or upset them due to accidental abuse or misuse.

There was the anxious question, “What happens if we get it wrong?”

I could see the image this man had in his mind as he hung grimly as his sinking team headed for the horizon at top speed out of control.

Connie saw it too and knew the answer perfectly.

He told us, “If you’re a team leader and you get it wrong, the team stops working.

This means that they stop pulling in the same direction and therefore cannot tear into any horizon, but they will let you know long before that all is not well.

You just have to watch for the signs they give you.”

He said: “The first thing to understand is that these are working dogs.

Dogs who get so excited about pulling that at the beginning of the day, when they’re fresh, they sometimes go too fast.”

If you stick to the three instructions they know and understand, “Stop”, “Go”, “Take it easy” and give them the support they need, they will do their best for you.

If you confuse them with unnecessary or conflicting orders or yell at them, they will stop working as a team. They take their weight off the rope, keeping it taut to make it look like they’re working, or they simply wander offline and start eating snow or fighting.

The first sign of this in a team is when the dogs start looking over their shoulder at the handler.

Usually the lead dog is the first, he turns while still pulling and you can see what’s on his mind from his eyes.

He says “just tell me what you want and I’ll do it” or “We’ll do the best we can, why don’t you get off and help instead of yelling at it.”

If you don’t pay attention to these first signs, team disintegration will follow.

Connie told a great story, but we were impatient to get behind our team.

I was initially paired with a guide, he started the dogs, stopped them and told me when to jump on the brakes.

He spent the rest of the time praising the team and the individuals.

At first I thought he got too much of this support and marveled at the careful way he named each dog and encouraged them, returning to praise the whole team.

at first it sounded overwhelming and I didn’t see any effect.

I mean really the team did exactly what a dog team was supposed to do.

They didn’t make a fuss, they pulled together in the same direction and kept their eyes straight, except occasionally acknowledging our guide’s words of acknowledgment, as if they knew he must also know his efforts were appreciated. .

There was a lot of shouting and noise from the sled behind us.

They had no guide and we had to stop for them to catch up.

Our guide had his hands full trying to pour as much attention and care into the team behind us who were clearly not enjoying themselves at all and needed help.

That’s when I realized what he was doing was physical.

He wasn’t just “nice” to the dogs, he provided the fuel the team needed to work.

Without the support he gave our team, the team behind fell apart.

The more the team stopped working, the more the drivers shouted, yelled and gave advice.

That’s exactly what Connie had told us would shut down the team, and she was absolutely right.

Halfway through, some of us changed sleds and I found myself behind us on the way out. One of the drivers of the outer section also stayed with this team.

We set off to a chorus of screams and cries, which the driver had wanted to motivate and push the team even more.

It was obvious that this confusing series of signals wasn’t working, the dogs turned around and looked at us, they didn’t pull and the sled didn’t move.

More shouts were added and the driver began a litany of the team’s faults and how it really ruined the day that we had such a bad team.

I remembered Connie’s words and suggested we try something different.

“Why don’t we just save our lives and see what the dogs do alone”.

The driver stopped shouting.

By saying “Hike up” (the modern version of “Mush”), the dogs would prick their ears, face forward, and start pulling.

We didn’t give the dogs another command.

They knew where they were going.

We helped go up the hill by scooting or running alongside and braked on the way down.

The rest of the time was spent providing the team with the fuel they needed to do their job.

“Good puppies, good puppies, well done Misty, good boy Laredo, well done midnight, good girl Mexico.

Good boy Butch, well done Sundance, good girl Cinders Good boy Butte. Good boys! Good girls!.

And just as I noticed a kind of backward glance from Laredo, he seemed to say, “Look, you’ll do it,” and then he went back to his job of staying in front of the sled and taking care of the youngster. on his shoulder.

The reason teams are made to work was not because Connie Arsenault had heard about the principles of management theory and wanted to try it.

The reason was that he competes in dog teams. He competes in dog teams the way they have been for hundreds of years, and he knew this was the way to win.

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