How To Get My 1 Year Old To Eat Solids The Ninja’s 5 Elemental Metaphysical Codes – Seeing With the Eyes of Universal Understanding

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The Ninja’s 5 Elemental Metaphysical Codes – Seeing With the Eyes of Universal Understanding

Gogyo’s 5-element transformation theory is a Chinese system that explains the growth, progression or destructive decay of energy in an ever-changing process. Godai’s ‘5-Element Manifestations’, described in Part 1 of this series, symbolize and categorize ‘things’ (ie solids, liquids, genders, professional titles, personalities, etc.) as they appear in an ever-growing and expanding universe. universe, gogyo “transformations” — based on the Taoist concept of in and yo (yin/yang in Chinese) indicate the development, progression toward, or blockage of energy in any “thing.”

Far from being conflicting theories, Godai and gogyo symbolism are actually mirror images of each other. In fact, in Buddhist mind sciences, the gogyo system can be seen as the sixth element (mind) that transforms godai into rokudai.

The five elements of Gogyo are…

…sui “water”…

…moku “wood”…

…also “fire”…

…make “earth”…

…and the related “metal”…

These elements, unlike the godai, have no real beginning or end as such. They “seem” to begin where the observer first perceives them and can be seen to progress in an endless series of cycles. The system has two parts. One, productive, progressive “growth cycle” and a career-destroying, blocking or blocking period.

The only universal constant is “Change”

Gogyo’s productive cycle, choosing an arbitrary starting point, is as follows:

Sui “Water”– energy is in a accumulating, accumulating, or sinking state. Unlike the godai element of the same name, the “water” element here represents the coming together of all the necessary components, which enables growth.

As an example, we could look at the growth of a plant and see how the seed from which it comes is only part of the whole process. But without the right soil conditions, moisture levels, mineral content and balance, heat, etc., the seeds won’t even begin to germinate.

Moku “Wood” — represents upward new growth. When the constituents of the “water” element meet and concentrate, they take on a “life” of their own, which appears to be separate and distinct from its basic constituents.

In our example of a plant, we see its stem or shoot break through the surface, when all the right conditions are present, and begin to reach out for sunlight, which continues to feed and nourish it.

Ka “Fire” — This element is also seen as part of the godai, but is used here in a different context, representing expanding or evaporating energy. Our plant opens in full bloom when it reaches full maturity. However, by doing so, it exposes more of itself to the air, allowing for more evaporation and moisture loss; which naturally leads to the next element.

MAKE “I”- is a representation of energy in a condensing state. From the initial growth phase of the “water” level and the expansion phase of the “fire state” the energy now begins to condense back into itself. As the plant matures, it begins to wither and dry out.

RELATIVES “Metal” – represents energy in a “hardening” condensing state. Our plant continues to desiccate until even the solid parts return to their mineral base forms – return to the soil from which they came. The moisture given up by the plant as it dries, the solid matter that returns to the soil to decompose, the gases given off during decomposition, and so on, all contribute to and lead to the “water” element of the next cycle.

The elements are not, and should not be thought of as separate and distinct phases, but rather as phases of a natural process. It is difficult to find the exact point of change from one to the other, but each is seen as a gradual emergence from the action of the previous elements. The seasons (for those of you in the temperate zone!) are a good analogy for this process. Unlike the man-made calendar, which has divided the year into four roughly equal parts, each measuring ninety-two to ninety-three days, nature takes its own course as it gradually transitions from spring’s new growth to our warmth and activity. everyone is enjoying the summer; which becomes the colors and beauty of autumn (which is really the drying of vegetation) and the slowing down of activity as the days gradually turn into the colder winter months. As I said, man has built this “reality” for convenience and then complains when spring doesn’t come on schedule!

The fifth “season,” here represented by the “water” element, can be seen in the “dog days” of spring. That “unofficial” season when the ground thaws, the ice melts, and everything prepares for the new growth to come.

hey ho – Battle strategy model

This same cyclical progression can be seen in a combat situation, and those who wish to prepare for a true defensive encounter should engage and work with it intensely. It can be viewed from either point of view: the point of view of the attacker or the point of view of the defender.

In the “metal” phase, the attacker plans the attack; the defender operates in a conscious state instead of the sleep-walking life typical of the “average” person.

The attacker moves into position, preparing his body for the attack — mentally and emotionally ready for what is about to happen; The defender becomes aware of the problem and also tries to position himself as the easiest possible solution.

Next, the attacker initiates the actual attack, either with an initial grab, punch or kick, or by causing a “seizure” from which he can apply psycho-emotional pressure (aka: stress); the defender gets the first attack – hopefully successfully!

Finally, the battle is fully heated as each participant counters, dodges, attacks, etc. in an attempt to win, until finally the tempo drops (“earth”), as each loses energy until the other either gains control or concedes, and the battle finally ends (“metal”). ).

Although it takes a lot to explain, the actual duration of events often takes less time than it took to read it.

Gogyo’s Destructive Cycle

Unlike Godai’s “manifestations”, which represent the “shape” or “form” that energy takes, the Gogyo system also has a “destructive” or energy-suppressing (NOT destructive) cycle. The same elements are involved, but they relate to each other in a different way. .Whereas the productive cycle shows the natural progression of energy from one stage to the next, the destructive cycle shows how each type of energy can be used to inhibit or destroy the other and prevent the productive cycle from continuing.

The elemental theory of relativity of this cycle is:

…earth … water … fire … metal … wood … earth …

(**Note that I’ve listed “earth” twice to show the continuous cycle of the process, not as an additional element. Also note that I arbitrarily chose “earth” as the starting point, but I could have chosen anything else instead.)

The logic of the flow can be seen in the obvious natural descriptions of the elements in that DO “earth” dams up and directs the flow of SUI “water”, which in turn destroys KA “fire” — just as cold water extinguishes a raging fire. “Fire” destroys the KIN of “metal” as the furnace turns iron ore into soup; “metal” destroys the MOKU of “wood” when a saw cuts down trees. Finally, MOKU, the “wood” element, then destroys the “earth” DO – just as the growth of plants and trees can be seen to move earth and even boulders out of their path.

The destructive cycle can also be seen as a strategy guide in battle if you understand the context of each element. Metal represents the design phase and will naturally progress to the equipment gathering or preparation phase unless stopped by a full attack (Incoming). The water phase of preparing for battle will naturally lead to an attack unless delayed or halted by information requiring a return to the planning (land) phase. Initial attacks (wood) progress effortlessly into the heat of battle unless thwarted by the opposing forces’ better laid plans (metal), causing the army to need more supplies and new preparation to continue. The battle’s fury wanes and ceases (earth) as each side evaluates its previous strategy for necessary changes, unless forced to resume by another attack (tree.)

This destructive cycle that stops energy from progressing to its next stages (causing it to either return to the previous stage or jump to the next) can also be seen in our factory.

The seed, as it’s preconceived (karmic) potential, represents the metal element. It will not progress into the growth stage (“tree”) of its life cycle if it does not receive the necessary moisture and nutrients (“water” accumulates) due to draft (“soil” drying out). A new shoot (“tree”) never blossoms (“fire”) if it meets the gardener’s blade (“metal”), but immediately enters the withering phase of the “earth” element. And so the process continues.

A model of escape and evasion tactics

Gogyo theory receives a lot of attention in the practice of ninja arts (and not limited to the Kasumi program designed and created by Stephen K. Hayes in the 80’s) The ninja’s Goton-po escape and evasion strategies are classified according to these elements, as well as the military strategy presented above teachings about

First, the Goton-po classes and some of the skills they consist of are:

DOTON-Jutsu — is the use of terrain, land, and geographic location to hide or escape, block, or attack enemy activity as it attempts to move through an area. Terrain navigation, reading the ground, tracking, and the ability to use a variety of vehicles are some of the skills that go with this strategy.

KINTON-Jutsu — use metal and steel in the form of tools to help our strategy. Various weapons, both artificial and improvised, tools used to enter and exit barricaded structures, and equipment for climbing or sitting on tall natural or artificial structures are examples of skill suggested by the “metal” element. .

SUITON-Jutsu — covering the use of actual water sources to escape and dodge, as well as to attack from afar. Induced flooding, survival skills and stealth swimming, collecting and purifying water in emergencies, and building and operating various watercraft represent some of the skills here.

MOKUTON-Jutsu — is the use of plants and other vegetation for survival, escape and evasion. Climbing skills (shotenjutsu), camouflage and concealment, using plants to make food, medicine and poisons, making rope, improvised shelters and carpentry skills are all implicit uses of the “wood” element.

KATON-Jutsu — is the title of Fire and Explosives Skills. Skills in this category include the use of multiple firearms, improvised explosives, building fire, and reflecting sunlight as a glare against the attacker’s vision.

This Goton-po the strategy was introduced to students of the old Kasumi-an program in early training as the basis for optional outdoor wilderness survival training. Today, students in my own Mastery Leadership programs have the opportunity to add this training to their program, and it is a necessary requirement Shinobi-kai certification of students and teachers.

A valid training model

Gogyo theory, like godai, whether or not they are a formal part of any particular school, remain valid and effective tools in the ninja’s arsenal; Both for learning the material covered and for application under stress. A deeper understanding of these theories is yet to come beyond the simplified descriptions given here.

Students who attend the Warrior Quest Intensive receive highly effective, actionable knowledge of the Gogyo 5 Elemental Codes, models of both self-defense and personal empowerment.

The final installment covers both of these powerful systems as mirrors of each other. We explore their application to the study of personal development and enlightenment, as well as their sister symbols in other philosophical systems that some often use in their research to enhance and understand the higher levels of the Ninja lifestyle.

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