What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old Paintball Tanks – CO2 Vs HPA

You are searching about What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old, today we will share with you article about What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old is useful to you.

Paintball Tanks – CO2 Vs HPA

Okay, so you bought your first paintball gun. Now what? In order for you to use your new paintball marker you will need a few other items: approved safety goggles, paintballs, and a tank. Here is where many new players get confused and may make the wrong decision. Which paintball tank should I buy and which one is best for my paintball marker?

In general, there are three main power sources for paintball guns:

1) CO2 cartridges (disposable)

2) CO2 tanks (re-usable)

3) HPA tanks (re-usable)

First, let’s go over some “lingo” that you may need to know….

CO2 – carbon dioxide gas

HPA – high pressure air (compressed air or compressed nitrogen)

psi – pressure measured in pounds per square inch

ci or cu – cubic inch when referred to the size of a tank and volume it can hold

oz – ounce, used to denote the size of paintball tanks and weight they can hold (9oz, 12oz, 20oz, etc…)

Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages, different costs, and applications. Here we will try to explain the major differences and offer some insight on which one might be best for you.

Disposable CO2 Cartridges (12 gram):

Very few paintball guns use the smaller 12 gram cartridges, however, they are still found on some models. Typically the 12 gram cartridges are a single use design and the cartridge is disposed of when the gas is depleted. Most 12g cartridges offer the user only 16-30 shots, depending on the type of paintball gun, before they are empty. There are different sizes of the disposable cartridges other than the 12g version, but they are less common and maybe harder to find.

The use of a disposable cartridge may require a special adaptor to be added to your paintball gun as many of them do not simply “screw” directly to the marker like the other types of tanks. The advantage of the disposable CO2 cartridges is their small size and light weight. They are also very easy to carry. The disadvantage is their low number of shots per use and the fact that they are not able to be re-filled and must be disposed of when used. In the long run they are also not cost effective when compared to the other types of paintball tanks.

CO2 Tanks (9oz, 12oz, 20oz, etc…):

CO2 tanks are the most common form of supplying gas to your paintball gun. CO2 is also one of the least expensive and most readily available forms of gas power. CO2 tanks come in several different sizes such as 7oz, 9oz, 12oz, 16oz, 20oz, and 24oz. The three most common sizes are the 9oz, 12oz, and 20oz tanks. As a general rule of thumb the 9oz tank will yield approximately 500-600 shots. The 12oz tank will yield approximately 700-800 shots, and the 20oz tank will offer around 1000-1200 shots.

The advantage to the CO2 tanks is the fact that can be re-filled at most paintball shops and fields and the cost is usually between $4.00 to $7.00 for a fill. When your tank runs out you simply take it to a paintball shop and get it re-filled. The re-fill time is less than 1 minute.

The disadvantage of the CO2 tank is that the liquid inside the tank can affect the performance of your paintball gun in a negative way. If the tank gets too hot the gas can escape through a blow-out valve leaving you with any empty tank. If the tank gets too cold the inside pressure can drop and give you sub-par performance or even freeze up the internal components of your gun. It is best to keep your CO2 tanks around room temp – no more than about 75 degrees f. CO2 output pressure is typically around 800psi but can vary under different conditions and thus not every shot will be the same. Some shots with CO2 can be “hotter” (higher velocity) while the next shot may be slower (lower velocity). This can be caused by the change in pressure in the tank due to the temp. As we all know, gas expands when heated and condenses when cooled.

It is important to note that not all paintball guns can use CO2 as a power source. Some of the newer, higher end, tournament-style markers cannot use CO2 and require HPA for proper operation. Use of CO2 in these types of paintball guns can damage the internal components and may void the gun’s warranty. Always consult your owner’s manual or the manufacturer’s website for the correct information.

As a general rule of thumb, CO2 is the most common source of gas for paintball guns and the vast majority can use CO2 or HPA. For example, most Tippmann guns (like the 98, A5, and X7) as well as most Kingman guns (like the Spyder series) can use CO2 and/or HPA both. CO2 tanks can range in price from $15 up to $35 but once you buy it – you own it and can re-fill it as many times as you need. Output pressure on most CO2 tanks is approximately 800psi.

HPA Tanks (3000-4500psi):

HPA stands for High Pressure Air. This is the newest and best source of power for most paintball guns that are equipped to use this type of air. As with CO2 and any other gas always consult your owner’s manual for proper use of your paintball gun. HPA is basically compressed air. Yes, air. Just like the air you breathe every day. Also, HPA can mean Nitrogen. When high pressure paintball tanks were first introduced and even today, many are filled with compressed Nitrogen. Although the recommended source of gas in the HPA tanks is compressed air, compressed nitrogen will work in most cases.

HPA tanks offer a cleaner source of air at a much higher pressure. HPA air is not affected by temp as much as a CO2 tank. HPA air is much more consistent and will provide very little change from shot to shot. Virtually every shot through your paintball gun with compressed air will be identical. HPA is commonly used in many tournament style paintball guns such as the Invert Mini, DP G3, Dye DM series, Angels, AutoMags, AutoCockers, and the likewise. HPA can also be used in many other types of guns as well, such as: most Tippmann and most Kingman guns. Again, please consult your owner’s manual for the exact needs of your specific paintball gun.

One important note about HPA – different paintball guns require different amounts of pressure to operate properly and different HPA tanks can output the pressure inside differently. Typically there are high output HPA tanks and low output HPA tanks. The high output tanks are approx 800-850psi, while the low output tanks can range from 200-450psi. Some paintball markers require the full 800psi to operate correctly, while other guns need only 200-300psi to operate. Again, check your gun to see what is recommended. If your gun needs 800psi to operate and you have a low output HPA tank then … your gun will not fire! HPA tanks are also available in different sizes. There are 3000psi tanks and 4500psi tanks. The psi rating (psi = amount of pressure in pounds per square inch) of the tank does not indicate the output pressure but rather just the amount of pressure the tank can hold. Within each pressure rating there can be many different sizes of tanks (45ci, 62ci, 68ci, 72ci, etc…). This rating determines the amount of gas, or volume, the HPA tank can hold. The higher the volume, the more shots per tank you will get. Like with CO2 tanks, HPA tanks are able to be re-filled at many paintball shops and fields, however, HPA is not as common as CO2 and may or may not be available in all areas.

The cost to fill your HPA tank can range from $3.00 to $10.00 depending on the shop, however, the equipment needed to fill HPA tanks is very expensive and many smaller paintball shops do not own the equipment – so before you buy an HPA tank make some phone calls and see if you can get your HPA tank filled in your area. HPA tanks can range in price from $65 up to $259 and can be made from aluminum, carbon fiber, fiberglass, and/or other composite materials. If your local shop cannot fill your HPA tank then you may be able to get a SCUBA tank at a dive shop and fill your HPA tank directly from the SCUBA tank. This method will typically only offer a limited number of fills and only provide 3000psi, however, if it is your only choice then do some research. The cost of SCUBA tank is around $200 and you will also have to buy a special fill station to transfer the air from the SCUBA tank to your HPA tank. These fill stations range around $50 – $75

All paintball tanks must be approved and tested every so often for safety. Most tanks require a safety test (hydro test) every 3 to 5 years. If your paintball tank is new then you should not have to worry about a safety test for some time, but if your tank is a few years old then it is best to have it checked by a professional before use. Safety First!

In conclusion, there is no way to say that one tank is better than another, however, your gun may require one type and not the other. In most cases, HPA is a great source of power for most paintball guns if it is available in your area. HPA is typically more reliable and will offer cleaner operation – just be sure your paintball gun can use it and check the output pressure needed by your gun to make sure you get the right tank. If HPA is not available or if your paintball gun cannot use HPA then CO2 tanks are the next best choice. Not only are they the most common, they are also much less expensive and much easier to get filled at your local paintball shop or field.

Video about What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old

You can see more content about What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old

If you have any questions about What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 6505
Views: 5490539 6

Search keywords What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old

What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old
way What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old
tutorial What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old
What Temp Is Too High For A 1 Year Old free
#Paintball #Tanks #CO2 #HPA

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Paintball-Tanks—CO2-Vs-HPA&id=2971860

Related Posts

default-image-feature

How Much Should You Feed A 1 Month-Old Baby The Advantages and Disadvantages of Different Types of Baby Bibs

You are searching about How Much Should You Feed A 1 Month-Old Baby, today we will share with you article about How Much Should You Feed A…

default-image-feature

When To Take 1 Year Old To Hospital For Fever A Beautiful Dying

You are searching about When To Take 1 Year Old To Hospital For Fever, today we will share with you article about When To Take 1 Year…

default-image-feature

How Old Was The Cast Of Friends In Season 1 Practical Content Creation: How Well Do You Know Your Market?

You are searching about How Old Was The Cast Of Friends In Season 1, today we will share with you article about How Old Was The Cast…

default-image-feature

Youtube 11 Year Old Boy Went To Heaven And Back Shwedagon Pagoda, The Golden Wonder Part 3

You are searching about Youtube 11 Year Old Boy Went To Heaven And Back, today we will share with you article about Youtube 11 Year Old Boy…

default-image-feature

Young Cute Boy Visits An Old Man Try This Side The Dragon Line Review – RUSH: Energy Taken to Innovative Echelons

You are searching about Young Cute Boy Visits An Old Man Try This Side, today we will share with you article about Young Cute Boy Visits An…

default-image-feature

Young Cool 5 Year Old Boy Hanging Out With Girls The Effects of the Father Daughter Relationship on Self Esteem – From First Love to Self Love

You are searching about Young Cool 5 Year Old Boy Hanging Out With Girls, today we will share with you article about Young Cool 5 Year Old…