Why Does My 1 Year Old Twitch In Her Sleep MS and Fatigue

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MS and Fatigue

Most of us (MS sufferers) consider MS fatigue to be the worst part of living with this chronic disease.

It is estimated that 85-95% of MS patients experience MS fatigue at some point during the disease. For those of us who live and cope with MS fatigue on a daily basis, it’s no surprise that it’s one of the main reasons people with multiple sclerosis (MS) work part-time or stop working.

On really bad days, dealing with MS fatigue is incredibly difficult and makes even basic needs a huge chore.

What most people don’t (or can’t) understand is this MS fatigue? But how do you explain and describe the overwhelming fatigue that makes anything, no matter how small, much more difficult to accomplish.

A really important piece of information that you need to know and be aware of is the need to control your body temperature as much as you can. Heat, humidity and warm weather have a very special effect on grape juices.

If you don’t want to experience what many consider to be the most common symptom of MS: MS fatigue, you need to learn how to control and manage your body temperature.

In layman’s terms, the messages our brain sends to the rest of our body don’t travel smoothly and quickly through our nervous system like they did before MS. The slowing down of all messages is caused by multiple scars located in patches where the disease has affected the myelin.

MS fatigue affects both motor and cognitive abilities:

Cognitive fatigue is the slowing down of mental functions when performing repetitive tasks.

Sometimes your mind feels stuck in first gear, making it almost impossible to answer a sudden question or do any quick thinking like before.

The US Social Security Administration recognizes MS fatigue-related impairment as a contributing factor to disability in MS patients. One basic criterion that many doctors use to distinguish MS fatigue from other forms of fatigue and fatigue from other multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms is the presence of fatigue symptoms on 50 percent of all days during an episode. 6 weeks.

What does MS fatigue feel like?

Everyone has experienced days when they are very, very tired. Right?

The sensation associated with fatigue in MS has a certain characteristic that makes it unique:

– It happens every day

– It can appear suddenly even after a very good night’s sleep.

– It gets worse as the day goes on.

– Heat and humidity usually make the situation worse.

– It appears suddenly and without signal or warning.

– It is more severe than what most people experienced when talking about fatigue, and most of the time it interferes with normal activities in daily life.

Some people have other related symptoms, such as:

– Hands and especially legs suddenly start to feel heavy. And when I say heavy, I mean “cement boots heavy.” The short walk from the family room to the kitchen turns into a real challenge!

– Any problems or difficulties you have had with your balance, vision or speech (blurring) are likely to get worse.

– You find it hard to focus and concentrate.

– Unsteadiness and dizziness are very common.

– Headache.

– You may feel sick, just like a cold.

– Strong feelings of depression.

There are many factors that cause fatigue in MS. They are grouped into: primary fatigue and secondary fatigue.

Primary fatigue It is the result of the disease process. The basic reason for it is demyelination of the central nervous system.

This fatigue is best described as an overwhelming feeling of tiredness that is not directly related to increased activity and is also known as Lassitude.

Heat sensitivity fatigue is because many of us with multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from hot or humid weather. Raising body temperature through exercise or exertion can have the same effect.

There’s also something called “short-circuit fatigue,” where the nerves in individual muscle groups, such as the legs, tire after a short walk or typing.

The good news is that most of the time we can combat this “short circuit fatigue” as well as heat sensitivity fatigue by wearing a cooling vest.

Secondary fatigue is not directly caused by multiple sclerosis (MS) itself, but is caused by or attempts to compensate for the symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

– Sleep disorders are common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), the cause of which is often convulsions, depression mixed with anxiety, pain, and frequency of urination during the night (at night).

– Sleep can also be disturbed by the side effects of certain medications (corticosteroids, such as Solu-Medrol.

– Additional efforts are needed to balance muscle weakness (mainly in the legs) that make it difficult to walk and maintain balance.

– The side effects of some medicines can also cause fatigue, including especially those taken to treat multiple sclerosis (MS), such as interferon medicines made from interferon beta (Avonex, Betaseron and Rebif).

– In addition, fatigue can be a side effect of certain drugs used to treat the symptoms of MS, such as Baclofen, Valium and Zanaflex, which are often prescribed to treat spasticity, or the painkillers Klonopin and Neuront.

Others include high blood pressure medications, allergy medications, and others that contain antihistamines and anti-anxiety medications.

Depression can be the reason you feel incredibly tired.

– Sometimes depression itself is a result of fatigue, and several medications used to treat depression can also cause fatigue.

– Lack of proper nutrition also causes blood sugar level fluctuations, which lead to general fatigue.

– A weakening of the body’s defenses due to infections, urinary tract infections and common colds or flu can increase fatigue.

– Neglecting regular exercise can significantly increase fatigue.

Here are 12 ways to combat MS fatigue.

Remember that the seemingly insignificant little things we do every day make a difference.

Always be sure to read or ask your doctor about the side effects that can cause fatigue from the medications you are taking, including antidepressants.

Drink plenty of water every day. Dehydration opens the door to feeling tired and drained. You might be one of those people who don’t drink water or drink very little water because of the side effects of an overactive bladder. I can definitely relate, but it’s better to deal with the “neck pain” of looking for the nearest bathroom than the consequences of being dehydrated.

I always have a water bottle with me and keep them in the fridge so it’s nice and cold.

Another plus to this is that water helps you flush out toxins from your body. So don’t waste this, make it a part of your MS diet.

Try to breathe properly. Getting used to wrong breathing and short and shallow breaths reduces the amount and quality of oxygen entering the cells. As a result, you start to feel exhausted very easily.

Start training. You’ve heard it before: regular exercise boosts your energy levels. So as the Nike TV commercials say… Just do it!

Depression causes fatigue. As simple as that, keep going, and I want to add a step back? Not even to get more impulse. You need to come to terms with your new reality, take a deep breath and move on YOUR LIFE.

Heat aggravates possible injuries. Whenever it’s too hot outside, I can go from almost normal, everyday, walking to barely standing, so if I don’t pay attention to my body, I can get into trouble. That’s why I wear a cooling vest and take up to 3 cold showers on really hot days.

Versatility is key here. Try to change your daily routine or better yet, make new plans for your future. Start learning something new, maybe another language or something you’ve always wanted to learn about, write that book you’ve been dreaming of writing. It doesn’t matter what it is, everyone needs a change in their life.

MS users like us have leg spasticity, cramps, or frequent late-night trips to the bathroom that keep us up at night. Try to rest as much as you need. A good place to start is to teach your body to go to bed around the same time every night. You need to make up for all those precious lost minutes.

Nutrition is very important and weight management will help you deal with fatigue. Start your MS diet and with the right exercise routine you will start to feel the difference.

Learn to conserve your energy by learning to pace yourself. You can start by planning and following your plan or priority list. Balance in life is as important as fatigue. Prioritize the things you want or want to achieve and learn to manage your energy effectively.

Don’t skip breakfast. When you wake up every morning, your body’s sugar level is at its lowest, so eating a good breakfast will definitely give you a boost of energy. Not eating anything in the morning is likely to increase fatigue early in the day. An excellent source of energy is found in foods rich in iron. Add fortified cereals, beans and fish to the diet of MS patients

Among the most commonly prescribed medications to treat MS fatigue are:

Symmetrel (amantadine hydrochloride)

Modafinil (Provigil)

Neither of these drugs is specifically approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MS fatigue.

Each has shown some benefit in clinical trials.

I tried Amantadine (my early multiple sclerosis (MS)) and Provigil a couple of years ago. With Amantadine I didn’t feel any change – don’t forget that Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is different for each of us – and with Provigil I felt a small improvement in my MS fatigue by increasing energy levels early on. day, but it didn’t last long. Today my neurologist has prescribed Adderall XR. Most days it helps me, but as with most MS fatigue, it’s very hard to put your finger on it.

I am a 46-year-old man with multiple sclerosis (MS) for the past 14 years. Fully aware of how difficult it is for other MS sufferers to tell family members and others what they are going through, decided to try to help other MS sufferers and created a website: http://www.MS-multiple-sclerosis-symptoms.com/

I lived in the US for almost 15 years and now live in Managua, Nicaragua with my wife and daughter. By following many of the tips on the website I am living well despite having MS.

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